Rehoming Your Pet

Please note: OHS is able to accept owner-relinquished animals only; any lost/stray animals must be brought to your local county animal services.

OHS would like to assist you in keeping your pet or give you the right tips on how to rehome on your own.

Rehome a Pet on Your Own

Here are some tips for ensuring your pet goes to a safe new home: Rehoming Packet (PDF) – view online, or download and print.

If You Need to Rehome Due to Behavior Concerns

OHS has a Behavior Help Line where you can get advice on your pet’s behavior concerns. You’ll be able to leave a recorded message, and OHS will return your call and offer suggestions.

(503) 416-2983

If You Need to Rehome Due to Medical Concerns

For Spay and Neuter assistance, the Spay and Save Program offers low and no-cost spay/neuter surgeries for cats owned by low-income residents in the greater Portland metropolitan area.

(800) 345-SPAY

For low cost health exams, vaccinations, microchipping and preventative care, Good Neighbor Vet offers these services at multiple mobile locations in Oregon and Washington.

(888) 234-1350

If You Need to Find Pet-Friendly Housing

Need to find a home that will accept you and your pets? Find pet-friendly rental resources here »

Rehoming Your Pet Through OHS

Making an Appointment to Surrender

If you would like to bring your pet to OHS so we can find a home for him/her, first call (503) 285-7722, ext. 212. Animals are accepted by appointment only and we do not accept walk-in surrenders.

Each animal will need to have a Pet Personality Profile filled our prior to their appointment. Our goal is to find the right match for the animals, which we can achieve by knowing more about the animals coming in to our care.

Dog Personality Profile

Cat Personality Profile

What Do I Need to Bring to my Appointment?

A driver’s license or other government issued ID.

Your pet’s veterinary records.

Any of the pet’s items you would like to surrender with the pet (toys, bedding, collars/leashes).

All dogs need to be on a leash or in a secured carrier.

All cats need to be in a secured carrier.

What Happens During my Appointment?

Our staff will review the animal’s history with you then take the animal back for an assessment. During the assessment, we are looking to make sure we can safely handle the animal and that the animal can be walked and/or housed around other animals. Scheduling an appointment does not guarantee admission to OHS.

What Are the Costs of Surrendering a Pet?

Why is there a surrender fee? On average, the cost of care for each animal in our care is $85 a day. This includes spay/neuter surgery, vaccines and flea/tick control, food and boarding and medical care.

Kittens and Puppies: There is no surrender fee, although donations are greatly appreciated. (Puppies and Kittens are considered 6 months or younger).

Dogs: $50 for the first surrendered dog and $10 for each additional dog.

Cats: $45 for the first surrendered cat and $10 for each additional cat.

Small Animals: (Domestic Rats, Gerbils, Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Small Birds) $15 for the first small animal surrendered and $5 for each additional small animal.

Surrender Frequently Asked Questions

Why Do I Need to Make an Appointment?

In order to ensure resources are ready and available when a pet arrives, Oregon Humane Society requires a scheduled surrender appointment. Without an appointment process, we would have no control over the number of pets that come into our care each day, and our ability to provide the best possible care for each animal would be hindered.

What Pets are Not Eligible for Adoption?

Animals who have been attack trained.

Animals with a history of aggressive or unsociable behavior.

Animals that display aggressive or unsociable behavior during a behavior assessment at OHS.

Veterinary examination determines that the animal is medically unsuitable for adoption through OHS.

Will My Pet Find a Good Home Through OHS?

Pets at OHS receive excellent care from trained OHS staff and volunteers. OHS does not place any time limits on an animal’s stay: a pet may stay at the shelter until a new home is found, whether it takes days, weeks, or months.