From Derelict House to OHS Hospital: 20 Cats Rescued

| Investigations / Rescue, News

Topaz, one of the 20 rescued cats.

An elderly couple in Portland’s St. John’s neighborhood breathed a sigh of relief last Friday when OHS removed 20 cats and kittens from their home and brought them to OHS for medical care and eventual adoption.

What started with just a few cats many years ago turned into a large colony of cats, as the felines reproduced and stray cats came and went through an open basement window. The homeowners were facing major issues of their own, as their decaying home’s electrical and plumbing problems were forcing them to relocate.

The cats rescued last Friday were being fed by the owners, but nearly all were in need of medical care that the couple could not afford. The OHS Holman Medical Center is now treating the cats for hair loss, eye infections and dental problems.

rescued cat Turquoise
Turquoise, another rescued cat now at OHS.

The cats are friendly with people and are expected to recover and make good pets for the right families. A handful of cats are available for adoption now, while others are waiting to be spayed/neutered or to receive additional medical care before they can be offered to the public. All available pets are listed on our website here »

“Everyone who had helped us has been very caring and considerate,” said one of the owners of the cats. “Don’t be afraid to reach out for help,” she advised other people who might be facing a similar situation.

Inside the house where the cats and the elderly couple were living.

The couple’s plight came to the attention of a visitor, who asked OHS to check in on the couple. After a meeting with an OHS investigator, the couple agreed to voluntarily relinquish the pets to OHS. “We’re here to help people when a situation gets out of control,” said Dr. Kris Otteman, OHS Vice President of Shelter Medicine and Operations. “We urge people to contact OHS if they know of someone who needs help caring for their pets.”

The arrival of the 20 cats comes as OHS is nearly at capacity for cats—especially older cats. OHS is currently providing care for more than 125 cats, more than two-thirds of which are older felines who typically take some time to be adopted.

While there are no time limits on how long pets stay at the shelter, OHS is encouraging potential cat adopters to visit the shelter now. “If you have been thinking about adopting a cat, now is a great time to meet your new furry soulmate,” said Dr. Otteman.

How You Can Help

Consider adopting a cat—especially an adult feline! See all available cats on our website here »

Need help finding new homes for your own pets? Contact OHS »

Contact OHS investigators about animal welfare, neglect, or cruelty situations in Oregon here »

Find our Wish List of needed supplies here »

 

 

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  • Katie Bond

    It’s sad but I can see how it could happen. We are fortunate people who care at the Oregon Humane Society are there to help.

  • GGG83

    Thank you OHS for helping the couple and the kitties!

  • Gia Poore

    Yay, I love that you do this!

  • ozpunk

    this is great news, made my day

  • Vanessa Chacon

    Maybe it wouldn’t be so bad if animal shelters helped earlier before things got out of control. There was a lady i tried to help out once and multiple shelters were like,”you have to catch the cats, make an appointment, pay these fees,blah blah blah…..”
    That’s why I don’t donate anymore…..manipulative propaganda.